“The Ioannidis Affair”

On March 17th, just as many countries were taking draconian measures to contain the SARS-COV-2 pandemic, the Greek-American meta-researcher and epidemiologist John Ioannidis, whom I often quote in my posts proclaimed a “fiasco in the making‘! With strong language and a few ad hoc estimations of COVID fatality rates he warned that based on poor data or no evidence at all politicians might inflict incalculable damage on society, possibly much worse than what a virus, putatatively as dangerous as influenza, could cause. As one of the most highly cited researchers in the world and a vocal critic of quality problems in biomedicine, his COVID related interviews, opinion pieces and articles since then have received a great deal of attention, in the scientific community, in the lay press, and especially among his worldwide fan base. Continue reading

We don’t need animal experiments! We get our drugs from the pharmacy!

Research using animals is a sensitive issue. Anyone who does animal experiments, like myself, is reluctant to talk about it, at least outside our natural habitat, the laboratory or scientific conventions. Institutions where animal experiments are carried out are also quite shy about the topic. Recently, the Max Planck Society left Nikos Logothetis (MPI Tübingen) standing in the rain when he was targeted by a media campaign. Now he and some of his laboratory staff are off to Shanghai… The websites of prominent research institutes feature all kinds of colorful illustrations showing immunohistochemistry slides, doctors and students in white coats with pipettes in their hands, sitting at computers or their microscopes. But rats or mice are conspicuously missing! They proudly display their research activities, and enthusiastically advertise (future) research breakthroughs towards completely new and effective therapies. But no reference is made to animal experiments on campus!

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World sensation: Increase in life expectancy by more than 10 years!

Anyone who follows this blog must get the impression that I am a nag and misanthropist. Nothing and nobody seems to please me. I alway find the sample sizes too small, the statistics too lazy, the data hand-picked, or the results too positive and the conclusions drawn from them too exaggerated. Also, I find the peer review system unreliable, not to mention support of mainstream research and giving to those who already have (‘Matthew effec’)  by the funding agencies. I even dared to critsize the Nobel Prize an atavistic instrument celebrating the lonely, white male reseacher and genius. Artificial intelligence I find stupid, and the academic career system the core of all these evils. To name but just a few examples.

But that is far from the truth! I am a science enthusiast! I am convinced that science is the best that the 1500 grams of protein and fat encapsulated in our skull have ever produced. Yes, I am a science nut. So with this entry, at the beginning of the new decade, let’s start with a proper hymn to biomedical science. Continue reading

Diet: Is nutrition science a more reliable source of advice than your grandmother?

Meat consumption is bad for your health. It gives you cancer, heart attacks, stroke, you name it. Says nutrition science. And they must know. After all, it’s a science. Is it, really?

A few years ago, Jonathan Schoenfeld and John Ioannidis took a standard cookbook and randomly selected 50 frequently occurring ingredients (sugar, coffee, salt, etc.). They then carried out a systematic literature search, asking whether there were epidemiologicial studies that had investigated the cancer risk of these ingredients. And they found what they were looking for. For 80% of the ingredients at least one study existed, for many even several. Of 264 of these studies, 103 found that the ingredient investigated increased the risk of cancer, while 88 reduced the risk! So  after all Joe Jackson was right: ‘Everything gives you cancer’! But wait a minute: Milk? Veal? Orange juice? Continue reading

Why do WE trust the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, but not the climate skeptics?

The societal acceptance of the results of our daily work as scientists is dire. The majority of the US population does not explain evolution with Darwin, but with Holy Scripture. Measles is on the rise again worldwide, because vaccination opponents smell a conspiracy by the pharmaceutical industry to make children autistic. A substantial proportion of the population does not believe that climate change is man-made. They believe that if you fear climate change you are hysterical, and manipulated  by interested scientists competing for funding and fame. Homeopaths treat disease with sugar pills, while the health insurers, with our money, foot the bill.

A popular recipe against this increasing rejection of relevant scientific findings is to provide more and better science education in schools and the media. Inspired by a lecture of the American sociologist and historian of science Steven Shapin, I respectfully disagree.

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Podcast mania

In letzter Zeit war ich zu Gast in einigen Podcasts und längeren Interviews, für Audiophile hier die links:

 

 

 

Spektrum der Wissenschaft

AUS FORSCHUNG WIRD GESUNDHEIT
Wie gut ist die biomedizinische Forschung?
Stefanie Seltmann

Heute stellen wir die Frage: Wie gut ist die biomedizinische Forschung? Stimmt es, was John Ioannidis von der amerikanischen Universität Stanford behauptet hat, dass die Hälfte aller wissenschaftlichen Artikel falsch sind? Beantworten kann mir diese Frage Professor Ulrich Dirnagl. Er leitet am Berlin Institute of Health das BIH Quest Center, das die Qualität und Ethik in der Wissenschaft erforscht. Er hat John Ioannidis ans BIH eingeladen, um als Einstein BIH Visiting Fellow mit ihm zusammen zu arbeiten.

https://www.spektrum.de/podcast/wie-gut-ist-die-biomedizinische-forschung/1702044

14 min


Inforadio Berlin

Dichtung und Wahrheit in der Forschung

Ulrich Dirnagl ist Professor für Neurologie an der Charité – und “Wissenschaftsnarr”, als der er regelmäßig eine Kolumne im “Laborjournal” schreibt. Mit Thomas Prinzler spricht er über Qualität und Ethik in der biomedizinischen Forschung. Denn zu oft würden Ergebnisse weggelassen oder auch gefälscht.

https://www.inforadio.de/programm/schema/sendungen/wissenswerte/202002/09/wissenschaft-forschung-medizin-ethik-faelschung-betrug.html

15 min


Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Wo Professor Zufall regiert  

Zu wenige Versuchspersonen, unsauber geplante Experimente, keine Replikation der Untersuchung: viele biomedizinische Studien haben Schwächen. So große, dass man stattdessen genauso gut eine Münze werfen könnte, meint der Neurologe Ulrich Dirnagl.

https://www.deutschlandfunkkultur.de/biomedizinische-studien-wo-professor-zufall-regiert.976.de.html?dram:article_id=458680#

7 min


Podcast Spektrum – Wirkstoffradio (André Lampe und Bernd Rupp)

WSR019 Schlaganfall, Stroke Units und die Verantwortung der Forschung 

150 min!


Podcast Kritisches Denken (Philip Barth, Andreas Blessing)

Episode 25 – Qualität in der Forschung

Im ersten Teil des Gesprächs mit Prof. Ulrich Dirnagl von der Charité Berlin sprechen wir über strukturelle Probleme in der Forschungslandschaft, die Reproduzierbarkeitskrise und den p-Wert. Details zur Episode

https://kritisches-denken-podcast.de/episode-25-qualitaet-in-der-forschung/

40 min


Podcast Kritisches Denken (Philip Barth, Andreas Blessing)

Episode 26 – Mikrobiomforschung und andere Hype-Zyklen

In Teil 2 des Gesprächs mit Prof. Ulrich Dirnagl unterhalten wir uns über die Mikrobiomforschung und wie Hype-Zyklen in der Wissenschaft verlaufen.

https://kritisches-denken-podcast.de/episode-26-mikrobiomforschung-und-andere-hype-zyklen/

60 min


Podcast Gesundheit Macht Politik

Ulrich Dirnagl | Forschung: This is an intergalactic emergency

https://gmp-podcast.de/blog/gmp053/


And here’s a video cast from the European Academy of Neurology

EAN 2019: Charles Edouard Brown-Séquard Lecture – Interview with Prof. Ulrich Dirnagl